Pro Wrestler Workout

eric_young

Eric Young’s unlimited supply of charisma has made him a mainstay inside the hearts of wrestling fans all over the world since his TNA debut in 2004. In April 2014 Young, for the first time, won the World Heavyweight Championship and is a multi-time World Tag Team Champion. He is also hosting the popular “Off the Hook: Extreme Catches” show on Animal Planet.

Eric Young Pro Wrestler Workout

As a pro wrestler and TV personality my schedule is always in flux and I am constantly on the move. This means different schedules different gyms different amounts of time different kinds of equipment. My workouts are constantly changing which I believe is a good and fun way to always be engaged and interested in your workouts and how to have a good workout no matter what kind of schedule you have.   Here is a full body workout that I love to do.

Athletic full body circuit. I call this one Box Jump Maniac!!

As a pro wrestler I have to maintain a high level of cardiovascular conditioning strength and durability all the while keeping my size. I’m about 5’11” and 235lb!   I have maintained a full time wrestling and part time TV schedule for over 10 years and have had no off season!  This workout is important for me to stay toned keep my strength and incorporate athletic movements that challenge me to work on core balance and reflexes.  In this example workout I am using box jumps as my athletic movement but you can switch box jumps for other movements like burpees, Turkish get ups, ball smashes, wind sprints, sled push or any other athletic movement that you like.

So here it is

Set 1 all weighted exercises to be done with moderate to heavy weight and perform 10-12 reps where the last 2 reps should be difficult. Immediately after body part exercise move quickly to athletic move in this example it is box jumps!

10x box jumps (do a challenge height for you depending in your comfort with these)

Chest: dumbbell press

10 box jumps

Arms:  dumbbell curls and overhead dumbbell Tri extensions.

10 box jumps

Back: Lat pull down

10 box jumps

Legs: dumbbell lunges

10 box jumps

Shoulders: lateral raises

Back to start of workout to box jumps and start rotation and exercises in this order for 4 full rotations with no pause or no rest until your last set of box jumps is complete

This is a pretty intense great full body athletic workout that I love doing. It burns a ton of calories and really helps with my conditioning and athletics

Exercise when You’re Hurting

home remediesThe following article is a small excerpt from one of my books.  I  hope you’ll want to learn more and let me help you to get into the best shape of your life.

Smart Exercise Swaps

“No pain, no gain” won’t work as an exercise mantra if you’re already injured. In fact, pushing yourself too hard when you’re hurting can land you at the doctor’s office (or worse). Still, aches and pains are no excuse to cut out exercise altogether—you just have to be smart about it.

To help you pick a safe but satisfying workout when you’re injured, I’ve chosen 8 more common injuries and how to pick a substitute.

Carpal tunnel syndrome

It’s often caused by…
Repetitive motions, such as typing or writing, gardening, needlework, and golfing; or swelling due to diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Women’s smaller wrists make them three times more likely than men to develop carpal tunnel.

You should avoid…
Push-ups, plank pose, and any other exercise that involves excessive bending the wrist forward or back; racquet sports can also cause flare-ups.

Instead, you should try…
Chest exercises where you can keep wrists straight and protected—using machines or dumbbells. Most exercises should be fine.  If you play sports, make sure your equipment is the proper size and fit.

Back pain

It’s often caused by…
Muscular strains, arthritis, soft-tissue injuries, and disc disease; or sports such as golfing, tennis, running, and bowling.

You should avoid…
Running, particularly downhill running, overhead lifting, the leg press machine  or anything that aggravates the pain should be avoided.

Instead, you should try…
Walking, stretching, protected abs exercises, swimming, recumbent bike, yoga and Pilates work well.   Also, be sure to wear the appropriate shoes for your sport.

Shoulder pain

It’s often caused by…
Impingement occurs when the space between your rotator cuff muscles and the bone on top of your shoulder narrows, pinching the tendons. Arthritis and bursitis can also cause shoulder pain.

You should avoid…
Repetitive overhead exercises, such as overhead presses or lifts with free weights, as well as pastimes that require similar movements.  Activities like gardening and painting, which inherently don’t cause any damage, could flare up the pain if done for hours.

Instead, you should try…
Front shoulder raises instead of overhead presses and lateral raises. Also temporarily eliminate sports and exercises that involve repetitive shoulder movements such as tennis and golf.

Shin splints

It’s often caused by…
A sudden increase in running mileage or intensity when you’re running or exercise walking.

You should avoid…
Running frequently, especially if you’re in pain. You don’t necessarily have to stop running altogether unless the symptoms are severe or getting worse.  Just cut back.

Instead, you should try…
Cross training combined with other forms of cardiovascular exercise, such as swimming or biking, that don’t involve repetitive impact.

Plantar fasciitis

It’s often caused by…
Tight calf muscles, foot-arch problems, long distance running, and sudden weight gain.

You should avoid…
Nothing.  But if you’re in pain, reduce any exercises with repetitive lower extremity impact, such as running.

Instead, you should try…
The elliptical trainer or bicycle may be preferable to running, as they do not subject the foot to the same stresses.

Neck pain

It’s often caused by…
Stress, osteoarthritis, carrying a heavy bag over one shoulder, cradling a phone between your shoulder and neck, degenerative discs, and poor posture while sitting at a desk.

You should avoid…
Some yoga positions, such as headstands, that put pressure on your neck, running or other high-impact moves that trigger neck pain should be avoided too.

Instead, you should try…
Walking, cycling, Pilates, and yoga positions that do not involve your head or neck stands.

Twisted ankle

It’s often caused by…
Rolling or twisting your ankle in an awkward way that stretches or tears the ankle ligaments.

You should avoid…
Any repetitive impact (like running or jogging) should be avoided in the days after the initial injury.

Instead, you should try…
Focusing on upper-body exercise or non-weight-bearing workouts such as a stationary biking or swimming. To regain range of motion, draw the letters of the alphabet with your toes.

Swollen knee

It’s often caused by…
A tear in the meniscus (which is a c-shaped cartilage shock absorber in the knee) or ACL tears. Patellofemoral pain—pain behind the kneecap—is the most likely cause of knee pain.

You should avoid…
Any exercise that recreates the pain, especially impact and stress such as running, lower extremity weights, and activities where you’re jumping or changing direction. Consider backing off of Stairmaster-type exercises.

Instead, you should try…
Swimming, water aerobics, some yoga and/or Pilates if modified to avoid certain painful exercises. Also, include daily hip, thigh, and knee strengthening exercises, such as leg raises.

Whether you want to look good or increase your athletic performance it’s important to train  The book ‘Get Fit Stay Fit’ details some of the most effective exercises and routines to help you with your overall development.

I know you want to get in shape and look great.  Whatever your fitness goal…to slim down…gain muscle…tone your arms or flatten your tummy…I’m here to help you accomplish your goals and to improve your fitness level. If you have enjoyed this article and the many other free features on my site, and would like some more comprehensive information such as fitness books and CD’s to aid you in achieving your health and fitness goals, please visit myONLINE STORE where you will find innovative natural health and beauty products to help you become the BEST YOU CAN BE !

Personality Fitness

fitnessThe following article is a small excerpt from one of my books.  I  hope you’ll want to learn more and let me help you to get into the best shape of your life.

Are you tired of the one-size-fits-all workout? Have you been doing the same workout for years?

Are you aware that your personality is one of the greatest factors in determining how or if you choose to stay fit and motivated? Just telling yourself that, “If I do this, I’ll be stronger, live longer and be the sexiest person on the block” isn’t really sustainable in the long run.

So where do you start?  If you want to maintain a physical exercise program indefinitely, you first need to make a higher connection with your mind and the overall workout experience. What stimulates you to want to stay fit? Once you’ve assessed what really motivates you, then you can evaluate your fitness preferences with a fresh perspective.

The real issue with exercise today isn’t that you don’t understand the value of physical activity or don’t have enough willpower, you simply haven’t learned how to enjoy it.  Enjoying your workout ensures that you’ll end up working out because you want to, not because you have to.

Think about which kinds of exercise best fit your lifestyle.  Experiment with different activities until you find the ones that best meet your needs for such motivators as feeling strong, feeling balanced, or learning new things.

  • Successful athletes often talk about being in a state of “flow,” in which they’re so absorbed in what they’re doing that they seem to accomplish it without thinking. You can practice this by becoming aware of what you’re doing, both mentally and physically, throughout your workout. Instead of “tuning out” to music or other distractions, try to enjoy the sensation of every movement.
  • >Instead of focusing on how much muscle you’re building or how many calories you’re burning, develop inner goals such as learning to understand your body. In every workout, try to improve on what you did in the previous workout and push yourself to learn new skills. Reaching these goals will help you build confidence in yourself as well as improve your body.
  • Put aside all the physical reasons that you should exercise and focus instead on the mental benefits. For example, consider how working out can help meet intrinsic needs for social interaction, discipline, relaxation or self-discovery, or just give you a much-needed break from the rat race. Going beyond the mere physical to understand your personality tendencies, primary needs and inner impulses can make exercise a much more powerful experience that will ultimately keep you coming back for more.

Once you’ve aligned your brain with your body, what you’ll learn from discovering your exercise personality could mean the difference between a successful, lifelong wellness program and becoming a fitness flop. To help you take your next or first step in a new direction, check out the following to determine which of these five fitness personalities is yours.

Select the Personality below that you feel best describes your feelings about fitness, then check out the activities to try. The results may surprise you!

Fitness Personality No.1
The Outdoor Adventurer

  • Bored by routine workouts
  • Spends as much time as possible outdoors
  • Prefers the trail to the treadmill
  • Usually competitive when it comes to sports
  • Exercises for the adventure and/or social experience

The key to this fitness personality is variety. When you’re exercising, you crave the sun on your skin and the wind in your hair. Going to the gym makes you claustrophobic. You have no need for exercise equipment or the ho-hum routine of fitness classes or instruction. You want to brave the road or the trail with a group or a friend at your side. Your personality is most likely to have trained for a marathon or triathlon and you enjoy participating in organized activities, such as adventure travel or fun runs and walks to raise money for charitable causes.

Social interaction is another key to helping you stay motivated and stick with your exercise program.

Other activities to try:

Archery Horseback Riding Skin/Scuba Diving
Basketball Jogging Snorkelling
Bicycling Jump Rope Surfing
Canoeing/Kayaking Mountain Biking Swimming
Cardio Paragliding Tai-Chi
Fly Fishing Pilates Tennis
Gardening Racquetball Walking
Golf Rock Climbing Weight Lifting
Handball Roller Skating Yoga
Hiking Skiing

Fitness Personality No. 2
The Mind/Body Connection

  • Enjoys a complete mind-body exercise package
  • Focuses on staying limber and flexible
  • Prefers to be instructed in a group setting
  • More interested in established exercise methods versus new fitness fads
  • Exercises to restore life balance or achieve peacefulness

The key to this fitness personality is to achieve a calming effect or restore balance to your hectic life. You dislike the latest fitness fads and you prefer tried-and-true methods, especially those steeped in ancient tradition or of a holistic quality that have a spiritual side.  When exercising, your mind works with your body to create a complete wellness package. If you do go to the gym, it is not for equipment use, but for the convenience of their abundant class schedule offerings. You usually exercise solo to minimize distraction, but don’t mind being part of group instruction as long as the class structure mirrors your objectives. Your personality is most likely to receive yoga or Pilates instruction, combined with healthy eating and lifestyle habits to enable both your body and brain to work together to stay balanced, limber and flexible.

Other activities to try:

Canoeing/Kayaking Nature Walks Tae-Bo
Fusion Exercises Qigong Tai-Chi
Kickboxing Resistance Bands Trail Hiking
Medicine Ball Exercises Skydiving Trapeze
Martial Arts Surfing Water Aerobics
Meditation Swimming

Fitness Personality No. 3
The Weight Lifter

  • Enjoys strength or resistance exercises that use repetitions
  • Wants to exercise all major muscle groups
  • Prefers to work out with a partner
  • Likes to see immediate results
  • Exercises to “blow off steam”

The key to this fitness personality is expending extra energy. You like to take charge and enjoy a challenge, so your workout will be most effective if you set goals. When exercising, you want to mentally be a million miles away from your daily routine, using this time to concentrate on strengthening the physical body you depend on. Going to the gym is a rush for you. Feeling the “burn” of exercise and seeing quick and measured results to your fitness efforts is what drives you to work hard in achieving your goals. You prefer to have a steady workout partner so you can chart your progress and cheer each other along. Your personality is most likely to have both a gym membership and workout equipment at home, to cater to your need for instant gratification.

Other activities to try:     

Aerobics Kickboxing Speed Walking
Cardio Medicine Ball Exercises Spinning
Fusion Exercises Pilates Yoga
Handball Racquetball Tae-Bo
Jogging Resistance Bands Tai-Chi
Jump Rope Sit-Ups Yoga

Fitness Personality No. 4
Cardio

  • Prefers exercise equipment or personal trainers
  • Tends to be an avid sports participant
  • Likes to alternate muscle groups in workouts
  • Enjoys aerobic exercise that revs up the heart rate
  • Exercises to increase energy, build stamina and burn calories

This fitness personality is based on activities that get your pulse racing. When you exercise, you enjoy seeing your body respond to your rigorous demands. Going to the gym makes you feel like you’ve done something good for yourself. You prefer to use classes, machines and free weights to work specific areas of your body, burn calories and build stamina. The challenge of fitness classes or personal trainers who where force you to keep up is something you crave. Your personality most likely has a gym membership, participates in sports, and exercises with friends.

Other activities to try:

Bicycling Running Swimming
Boot Camps Skiing Tae-Bo
Circuit Training Skin/Scuba DivingTai-Chi
Fusion Fitness Spinning Tennis
Hiking Stair climbing Urban Fitness
Jogging Jump Rope Yoga
Mountain Biking Surfing Roller Skating
Pilates Racquetball Rock Climbing

Fitness Personality No. 5 
Gentle Activity

  • Avoids the gym
  • Uncomfortable exercising in groups
  • Prefers low-impact fitness routines
  • May be working around old sports injuries or other health concerns (such as back pain, etc.)
  • Exercises to build resilience, stability and self-confidence

This fitness personality has the need to increase resilience, flexibility, stability and self-confidence. You avoid the gym at all costs and prefer low-impact fitness, like walking or yoga, to more rigorous or “jarring” exercise, like jogging or weight-lifting. When exercising, you want to participate in activities that feel good to your body, without the stress of competitiveness or an audience. You may be hindered by injuries or other health concerns that make it difficult to receive generalized group instruction. Your personality is most likely to have tried fitness fads and gadgets with little success.   You tend to achieve better results on your own terms with exercises that feel natural to perform.

Other activities to try:

Archery Golfing Strength Training
Biking Horseback Riding Stretching
Canoeing/Kayaking Medicine Ball Swimming
Conditioning Exercises Tae-Bo Fishing
Meditation Tai-Chi Nature Walks
Walking Gardening Qigong
Aerobics Resistance Bands Workouts on Video

Whether you want to look good or increase your athletic performance it’s important to train  The book ‘Get Fit Stay Fit’ details some of the most effective exercises and routines to help you with your overall development.

I know you want to get in shape and look great.  Whatever your fitness goal…to slim down…gain muscle…tone your arms or flatten your tummy…I’m here to help you accomplish your goals and to improve your fitness level. If you have enjoyed this article and the many other free features on my site, and would like some more comprehensive information such as fitness books and CD’s to aid you in achieving your health and fitness goals, please visit my ONLINE STORE where you will find innovative natural health and beauty products to help you become the BEST YOU CAN BE !.

How Fit are You

fitness_cartoonThe following article is a small excerpt from one of my books.  I  hope you’ll want to learn more and let me help you to get into the best shape of your life.

If you look up Fit in the dictionary it has several meanings.  The one that is relevant here is Physical fitness, how well a person is suited for physical tasks. Not exactly helpful, as it doesn’t say anything about how many pushups you should be able to do or how much weight you should be able to lift or how fast you should be able to run.

In my book ‘Get fit Stay fit’, I show you several fitness tests that are guidelines as to where you are and what you should be able to do, to help you keep track of your performance and your progress.

Here are 10 simple but not easy things you should be able to do before you can say that you are “in shape.”  The good news is if you don’t measure up to the high standards right away, there are tips and training strategies you can use to help you to obtain the high goals.  If and when you accomplish all 10 goals, then you won’t need to look in a dictionary for the definition of fit, you’ll just have to look in the mirror.
10 Standards to Assess Your Fitness Level

1) Bench 1.5 Times Your Body Weight

Upper-body strength is important for more than bench-press bragging rights or looking great in a tank top.

The Test: Use a bench-press machine and keep your feet flat on the floor during the entire lift. To get your score, divide the heaviest weight you can lift one time by your body weight.

The Scorecard:
Less than 1.0: Weak
1.0-1.49: Ordinary
1.5 or more: You rule on the bench

Boost Your Bench Press: The key to strengthening any muscle is lifting fast. Using a weight that’s about 40 percent of what you can lift one time, do nine sets of three repetitions, with 60 seconds’ rest between sets. Lower and raise the bar as fast as possible, and alternate your grip every three sets, so that your hands are 16, then 20, then 24 inches apart.

Three days later, perform three sets of flat, incline, or decline barbell bench presses (alternate varieties each week) with the heaviest weight you can lift six times.

Bonus tip: Press your head into the bench as you lift. You’ll activate the muscles called neck extensors, which help ensure that your spine is in a straight line. That’ll put your body in a stronger position.

2) Run 1.5 Miles in 10 Minutes

Breaking the 10-minute mark for a mile and a half is an indicator of peak aerobic capacity, where your body is able to deliver oxygen to your working muscles. Regular aerobic exercise lowers your cholesterol and helps keep your body fat low, both of which significantly decrease your risk of heart disease.

The Test: Run 1 1/2 miles on a flat path as fast as you can.

The Scorecard:
12 minutes or more: Slow
Between 10 and 12 minutes: Ordinary
10 minutes or less: Endurance excellence

Air Out Your Aerobic Ability:
To build aerobic capacity, you need to run far. But you also need to run fast.

Perform a 40- to 60-minute run on Saturday at a pace just slow enough that you never feel winded. (Walk if you need to.)

On Tuesday, do four to six half-mile intervals at your goal pace for the mile-and-a-half run. (If your goal is 10 minutes, run each interval in 3 minutes, 20 seconds.) Rest for the same amount of time as each interval takes.

On Thursday, perform four to six uphill runs at a moderate pace, with each lasting about 90 seconds, and take about 2 minutes’ rest after each interval. After your last interval, jog for 10 to 15 minutes at an easy pace.

Bonus Tip:
Train like Roger Bannister. That is, split the distance into four 600-yard intervals and run them at a pace that’s about 10 percent faster than your 11/2-mile pace, resting 1 minute after each. Bannister used this method to train for the first sub-4-minute mile.

3) Touch the Rim

A good vertical leap is the ultimate sign of lower-body power. It means you can combine lower-body speed and strength into one quick movement. And that’ll help you anytime you need to move explosively.
( If the rim is out of reach, make the backboard your goal.)

The Test:
You’ll need a small bag of chalk to do this test. Chalk your fingers and stand flat-footed next to a wall. Place your chalked hand as high as possible on the wall and mark it with your fingertips. Then, without taking a step, dip your knees, swing your arms up, and jump as high as you can, again marking the wall with your fingertips. The distance between the two marks is your vertical-jump height.

The Scorecard:
20 inches or less: Grounded
Between 20 and 26 inches: Ordinary
Higher than 26 inches: High flyer

Have Better Hops:
To leap higher, you have to practice explosive jumps.
Stand on a box or step that’s about 12 inches high. Step off the box, and as soon as your feet hit the floor, jump as high as you can. Repeat five times.

Do four more sets, resting 30 seconds between sets.

Bonus Tip: Never use your first jump as your score. You can expect maximum air on your third attempt.

4) Leg-Press 2.25 Times Your Weight

When it comes to strength, your lower half is your better half. Your leg and butt muscles are the foundation of your body and essential for almost any activity, from standing upright to sprinting to pushing. Make your leg-press goal 400 pounds.

The Test: Assume the position in a leg-press machine. Lower the weight until your knees are bent 90 degrees, and then push the weight back up. To get your score, divide the highest amount of weight you can lift one time by your body weight.

The Scorecard:

Less than 1.8: A shaky foundation
1.8 to 2.2: Ordinary More than
2.2: Serious strength

Get Stronger Legs: Try this technique, called diminished-rest interval training. You’ll improve your leg-press performance by 10 to 20 percent in 3 weeks. Using a weight that’s about 95 percent of the amount you lifted in the test, perform 10 sets of one repetition, resting 80 seconds after each set.

Do this workout twice a week, each time reducing the rest period between sets by 10 seconds. When your rest period is down to 30 seconds, retake the test and increase the weight.

Bonus Tip:
Right before you take the test, do a leg press with 20 percent more weight than what you think you can lift one time but lower the weight only halfway before pushing it back up. When you perform the test, your muscles will be expecting a heavier weight. It’ll not only seem easier, but you’ll be able to push more pounds.

5) Swim 700 Yards in 12 Minutes

Funny thing about swimming is that some people can run 26 miles without breathing hard, yet sink to the bottom of a pool after half a lap. Why? Because swimming requires both aerobic capacity and upper-body muscle

The Test: Swim as far as you can in 12 minutes. Your total distance in yards is your score.

The Scorecard:
Less than 500 yards: You’re sunk
500-700 yards: Ordinary
More than 700 yards: Aquatic excellence

Swim Better, Swim Farther:
Only two out of 100 people swim well enough to complete a quarter of a mile without stopping. That’s usually because they have poor form.
Follow this rule: Keep your head aligned with your body (the way you hold it when you’re not in the water) the time you’re swimming. When you breathe, roll your entire body, as if you were breathing with your belly button, without changing the position of your head. You’ll float better and use less energy. And that means you’ll be able to swim farther.

Bonus Tip: Swim 25 yards at a time to practice your form. Start by swimming a total of 200 yards per session, eight 25-yard intervals. Add 50 yards each week until you’re swimming a total of at least 500 yards. Increase your intervals by 25 yards every 2 weeks until you’re able to swim the entire distance without stopping.

6) Do 40 Pushups

Pushups measure upper-body endurance, the ability to use your strength over time. If you can crank out 40 pushups, we guarantee that your body won’t quit when everything’s on the line.

The Test: Lower your body until your upper arms are parallel to the floor, then push yourself up. Repeat as many times as you can.

The Scorecard:
25 or fewer: Weak
26-39: Ordinary
40 or more: Strong and tough

Build an Upper Body for the Long Run:
Try this program . Perform sets of half the number of pushups that you completed in the test, resting 60 seconds between sets, until you’ve done a total of 40 pushups. (For example, if you did 12 pushups in the test, you’ll do seven sets of six pushups.)

Each workout (do it every 4 days), deduct 5 seconds from the rest interval. After 12 workouts, you’ll be able to do 40 pushups without rest.

Bonus Tip: Time how long it takes you to do as many pushups as you can. Then rest for the same time period, and repeat the process two to four times. You’ll quickly improve your upper-body endurance.

7) Measure Up

The more fat your body stores in your midsection, the higher your risk of heart disease.

The Test: The easiest method of determining your risk level is a comparison of your waist and hip circumferences. Grab a measuring tape and measure the circumference of your waist at the narrowest point. Then measure the distance around the widest part of your hips and butt. Divide your waist circumference by your hip circumference for your score.

The Scorecard:
0.92 or higher: not good
0.82 to 0.91: Ordinary
0.81 or less: Flat and happy

Shrink Your Belly:
A combination of diet and exercise will help you lose weight the fastest..

Try this simple method to make the transition from chip eater to healthy.  Cut 250 calories from your diet and burn 250 calories a day through exercise. That’s a total of 500 calories, enough to lose a pound a week.

250 calories is about the same as a 20-ounce Coke, a small bagel, or two handfuls of potato chips. To burn the same number of calories through exercise, a 180-pound man could lift weights for 30 minutes, walk 2 1/2 miles, or play basketball for 20 minutes.

Bonus Tip: Limit your carbohydrates, especially the high-sugar kind after 5 p.m. Research shows that as the day progresses, your body has a greater potential to store them as fat.

8) Run 300 Yards Sub 1 Minute

If you can cover 300 yards in 60 seconds, you have the speed and drive you need for just about anything.

The Test: Run as fast as you can between two lines spaced 25 yards apart. Do six round-trips, for a total of 300 yards.

The Scorecard:
More than 70 seconds: Slow
60 to 70 seconds: Ordinary
Less than 60 seconds: Fast and agile

Increase Your Speed: Train with sprint intervals three times a week.

Sprint at 85 percent of your full effort for 1 minute.

Then run at a lower intensity about 40 percent of your full effort for the next minute.

Continue to alternate between intensities for 20 minutes. Try this workout on a hill to get even better.

Bonus Tip: Sprint as hard as you can each time you push off the line for your first three steps. Then stride though the middle portion of each 25-yard sprint by simply trying to maintain the momentum you gained from your sprint. This will increase your speed drastically, since the starting and stopping parts of the run are where most let up. That’s because accelerating or decelerating is more physically demanding than just running.

9) Touch Your Toes

Flexibility really does equal fitness and having flexible muscles will help keep you moving, in the gym, on the court, at the golf course as you get older.

From age 35 to 50, the average  flexibility decreases by 25 percent. That can lead to shoulder injuries and runner’s knee. Plus, tight pectoral muscles limit your strength, so your weight workouts will suffer.

The Test: One of the best measures of flexibility is the sit-and-reach test.

Here’s How to Do It: Place a yardstick on the floor and put a foot-long piece of masking tape across the 15-inch mark.

Sit down with your legs out in front of you and your heels at the edge of the tape, one on each side of the yardstick.

Put one hand on top of the other and reach forward on the yardstick as far as you can by bending at your hips. Your score is the number your fingertips touch.

There are more flexibility tests in my book ‘Get Fit Stay Fit’

10) Toss a Basketball 75 Feet Kneeling

I know what you’re thinking, what’s the point?  Here’s why it’s important: Throwing for distance is the ultimate measure of your upper-body power (that’s strength plus speed).

The Test: Kneel on the court, just behind the baseline. Throw the basketball overhand as far as you can. The top of the key at the far end of the court is 73 feet, just short of the standard.

The Scorecard:
Less than 60 feet: Lousy arm
60 to 74 feet: Ordinary
More than 74 feet: Cannon fire

Make Your Upper Body More Powerful: The single-arm clean and press will improve both upper-body speed and strength. Grab a dumbbell with an overhand grip and hold it in your left hand so that it hangs down at arm’s length in front of you.

Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart and your knees slightly bent. Explosively pull the dumbbell straight up by dipping your knees, then straightening up as you shrug your shoulder. As you pull upward, rotate the weight in an arc over your upper arm until the dumbbell rests on the top of your shoulder. Your upper arm should be parallel to the floor, and your knees slightly bent again.

Dip at your knees and push the weight above your shoulder until your arm is straight. Return to the starting position and repeat with your right arm. Do this move 2 days a week, with 3 days of rest in between. Perform three sets of four repetitions with a heavy weight in one workout, and eights sets of one repetition with a lighter weight, about 30 percent of the heaviest weight you can lift one time, in the other.

Bonus tip: Throw the ball at a 40- to 45-degree trajectory. It’ll go farthest that way.

Whether you want to look good or increase your athletic performance it’s important to train  The book ‘Get Fit Stay Fit’ details some of the most effective exercises and routines to help you with your overall development.

I know you want to get in shape and look great.  Whatever your fitness goal…to slim down…gain muscle…tone your arms or flatten your tummy…I’m here to help you accomplish your goals and to improve your fitness level. If you have enjoyed this article and the many other free features on my site, and would like some more comprehensive information such as fitness books and CD’s to aid you in achieving your health and fitness goals, please visit my ONLINE STORE where you will find innovative natural health and beauty products to help you become the BEST YOU CAN BE !

Starting

j0198050The following article is a small excerpt from one of my books.  I hope you’ll want to learn more and let me help you to get into the best shape of your life.

This is perhaps the most difficult part of trying to lose weight and get into shape. We have been conditioned from birth to eat at least three meals a day. You have to eat or you’ll die, it’s that simple. You sometimes eat the wrong food, or too much or too little, but you do eat. Exercise is not that simple because you can live without it. It takes a commitment and dedication to start and maintain an exercise program. Only 15% of adults exercise the recommended 30 minutes of moderate activity five days per week.

It’s much easier to say, ‘I’ll start tomorrow’, or ‘I don’t feel like working out today’. My advice to thinking like this is ‘Just do it’. Including an exercise program into your lifestyle three to five times a week is very important. Once you get yourself conditioned to working out, it’ll become just like eating and sleeping, part of your daily life.

There will be days however you just do not feel well or don’t want to work out. For these blue days here is a tip, say to yourself you will start your routine. Do one set or three minutes of aerobics. If you still do not feel like training, then stop and come back tomorrow. This way you have not broken your routine and continued the conditioning process that will help you to maintain your training program. Chances are you will finish your workout and be glad you did.

You’ve all heard the saying ‘NO PAIN NO GAIN’. Well at first you will experience some muscle stiffness and if you’ve decided to do some muscle toning you may experience some muscle soreness, but not pain. If you do experience pain you are doing something wrong.

The pain they talk about is actually a burning sensation, here is how it happens. Inside your muscle cells is your body’s energizer, an organic compound called Adenosine Triphosphate or ATP. When ATP is broken down it releases a spark of energy that stimulates hundreds of microscopic filaments and cross strands within each cell and this triggers a muscle contraction. This chemical reaction repeats constantly and it is fueled by when we eat, drink and breathe.

When you begin to exercise ATP is quickly used so your cells create more from another compound called Creatine Phosphate or CP. Once it’s all gone your muscle cells draw on sugar (glycogen). Enzymes break the glycogen down to produce CP that in turn is converted into ATP. As the glycogen is used, lactic acid is created. As it accumulates in your cells, it begins to retard the ability of your muscles to contract and thus you get that burning feeling. This process is anaerobic (without oxygen) and allows you two to three minutes worth of contractions before the lactic acid builds up and inhibits your ability to workout. In this state ATP is metabolized without oxygen because your heart and lungs cannot provide oxygen fast enough.

When you continue strenuous activity beyond this two to three minutes, oxygen is able to come to the rescue and combines with the lactic acid to produce glycogen, which is then converted to CP and finally ATP. This is the aerobic state and allows your muscles to contract indefinitely, provided oxygen remains available.

Setting up your exercise routine is like reading a roadmap. There are many different paths to get you to your final destination. Setting up a routine and sticking to it will help you get to your final destination without getting lost, however there may be a few detours along the way.

How many exercises, what type and in what order depends on your objective and is explained in greater detail in the book ‘GET FIT STAY FIT’. But generally beginners should do one to two exercises per body part. Intermediate two to three and advanced should do three to four exercises per body part.

You should also train your larger muscles first because smaller muscles fatigue first and will limit the amount of weight you can handle when you start working the larger muscles. For example when training chest the triceps muscle is also worked. If you trained your smaller triceps muscle before training your larger chest muscle, you would find you had no strength left to perform your proper chest routine.

Rest and variety are very important. If you workout every day without alternating your routine or allowing sufficient time for your muscles to relax and rebuild, you will actually be doing more harm then good to your body.

Here are some precautions you should look out for;

– You should have a physical by your doctor before starting any exercise regiment

– If you find yourself fatigued two hours after you finish working out your routine is probably too intense for your current ability and you should reduce your intensity.

– Alcohol and exercise do not mix, never have and never will. Alcohol can inhibit your performance, cause dehydration and possibly lead to injury

– Smoking inhibits the exchange of oxygen in your lungs and therefore not enough oxygen is available to your muscle that need it when working out, thus decreasing your performance. Also may cause you to have shortness of breath.

– Do not exceed your limits. Keep track of your heart rate and make sure you are performing in your desired range.

– Exceeding your limits can also cause insomnia, blurred vision, and generally a lack of energy and irritability.

I know you want to get in shape and look great.  Whatever your fitness goal…to slim down…gain muscle…tone your arms or flatten your tummy…I’m here to help you accomplish your goals and to improve your fitness level. If you have enjoyed this article and the many other free features on my site, and would like some more comprehensive information such as fitness books and CD’s to aid you in achieving your health and fitness goals, please visit my ONLINE STORE where you will find innovative natural health and beauty products to help you become the BEST YOU CAN BE !

Mistakes

j0104748The following article is a small excerpt from one of my books.  I hope you’ll want to learn more and let me help you to get into the best shape of your life.

Here is a list of some of the most common mistakes that are made when working out and hopefully you can avoid making these same mistakes.

1. Not stretching properly or enough before starting your workout

2. Not warming up properly before exercising

3. Not cooling down properly after exercising

4. Trying to lift more weight than you can handle and not using proper form

5. Working out too intensely for the level you should be at

6. Not drinking enough water 

7. When using aerobic machines like the stair stepper and walkers, you lean too heavily on the handrails.

8. Dogging it. Just hanging out at the gym to say you go to the gym and therefore you don’t workout at the intensity that you should in order to receive the benefit.

9. Consuming too many calories before a short low level intensity workout

10.Not using proper form and using momentum or swinging the weights to perform the exercise

I know you want to get in shape and look great.  Whatever your fitness goal…to slim down…gain muscle…tone your arms or flatten your tummy…I’m here to help you accomplish your goals and to improve your fitness level. If you have enjoyed this article and the many other free features on my site, and would like some more comprehensive information such as fitness books and CD’s to aid you in achieving your health and fitness goals, please visit my ONLINE STORE where you will find innovative natural health and beauty products to help you become the BEST YOU CAN BE !

D.O.M.S

j0194328The following article is a small excerpt from one of my books.  I hope you’ll want to learn more and let me help you to get into the best shape of your life.

Just about everyone experiences some sort of soreness the day or so after a workout. This pain, stiffness or discomfort is known as Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness or DOMS for short.

The reason for this soreness has and is a mystery although there are several plausible theories.

The first of these theories is the Torn Muscle theory. This theory says that microscopic tears in the muscles is the cause of DOMS. The Second theory is the connective tissue theory. This theory says the damage to the connective tissue attached to the muscle is the cause of DOMS. The Third theory, the inflammation theory says the pain is simply a result of our bodies attempting to fix the damage that we’ve caused during our work out. Although these theories have some relevance, it’s not known whether one or all three of these theories are correct.

What is known is the Pain of DOMS occurs within the first 24 to 48 hours after intense exercise, and will usually subside within seven to ten days after the initial workout that caused the damage.

There are three types of muscles in your body, Cardiac (heart muscle), smooth (lines your blood vessels) and skeletal (attached to your bones). DOMS effects only the skeletal muscle and can occur in any muscle on your body regardless of your fitness level.

DOMS is also not caused by a lactic acid build up. Lactic acid is a by product of burning sugars during an intense workout and almost all of the lactic acid is removed within an hour or so after exercising. Although Lactic acid may cause your muscles to fatigue, DOMS is a different problem.

DOMS does not result in any long term damage to your muscles.

While there is no magic formula to stop the pain associated with DOMS, there are a few things you can do to lessen or reduce your discomfort. The first thing to do is to make sure you warm up properly and include stretching. Stretch only to the point where you feel a slight discomfort and hold that stretch for between 10 and 30 seconds.

If your pain from DOMS is severe, you may want to try taking some aspirin, but be careful because aspirin increases the excretion of Vitamin C, which is needed to make the connective tissue which is damaged. Also studies suggest Vitamin C supplements will lessen the pain associated with DOMS and it makes sense because Vitamin C is involved in making new connective tissue. If you do decide to take Vitamin C supplements and Aspirin for the pain, try to separate their intake by a few hours, this way you won’t be negating the good the Vitamin C can do.

I know you want to get in shape and look great.  Whatever your fitness goal…to slim down…gain muscle…tone your arms or flatten your tummy…I’m here to help you accomplish your goals and to improve your fitness level. If you have enjoyed this article and the many other free features on my site, and would like some more comprehensive information such as fitness books and CD’s to aid you in achieving your health and fitness goals, please visit my ONLINE STORE where you will find innovative natural health and beauty products to help you become the BEST YOU CAN BE !

Sweat

sweatThe following article is a small excerpt from one of my books.  I hope you’ll want to learn more and let me help you to get into the best shape of your life.

Perspiration or sweat is your body’s way of cooling itself, whether that extra heat comes from hardworking muscles or from over stimulated nerves.

The average person has 2.6 million sweat glands Sweat glands are distributed over your entire body, except for your lips, nipples and external genital organs. Your sweat gland is in the layer of skin called the dermis.

The sweat gland is a long, coiled, hollow tube of cells. The coiled part in the dermis is where sweat is produced, and the long portion is a duct that connects the gland to the opening or pore on your skin’s outer surface. Nerve cells from the sympathetic nervous system connect to the sweat glands.

There are two types of sweat glands:

  • Eccrine – the most numerous type that are found all over the body, particularly on the palms of the hands, soles of your feet and forehead
  • Apocrine – mostly confined to your armpits and your anal-genital area. They typically end in hair follicles rather than pores.

These two glands differ in size, the age that they become active and the composition of the sweat that they make. Compared to apocrine glands, eccrine glands are smaller, are active from birth (Apocrine glands become active only at puberty) and produce a sweat that is free of proteins and fatty acids

We are constantly sweating, even though we may not notice it. Sweating is your body’s major way of getting rid of excess body heat, which is produced by metabolism or working muscles. The amount of sweat produced depends upon your state of emotion and physical activity. Sweat can be made in response to nerve stimulation, hot air temperature, and/or exercise.

When your sweat gland is stimulated, the cells secrete a fluid, that is similar to plasma, that is, it is mostly water and it has high concentrations of sodium and chloride and a low concentration of potassium — but without the proteins and fatty acids that are normally found in plasma. The source of this fluid is the spaces between your cells (which get the fluid from the blood vessels (capillaries) in the dermis. This fluid travels from the coiled portion and up through the straight duct.   What happens in the straight duct depends upon the rate of sweat production or flow:

Sweat is produced in apocrine sweat glands in the same way. However, the sweat from apocrine glands also contains proteins and fatty acids, which make it thicker and give it a milkier or yellowish color. This is why underarm stains in clothing appear yellowish. Sweat itself has no odour, but when bacteria on the skin and hair metabolize the proteins and fatty acids, they produce an unpleasant odour. This is why deodorants and anti-perspirants are applied to the underarms instead of the whole body.

The maximum volume of sweat that a person who is not adapted to a hot climate can produce is about one litre per hour.  If you move to a hot climate, your ability to produce sweat will increase to about two to three litres per hour within about six weeks! This appears to be the maximum amount that you can produce.

When sweat evaporates from the surface of your skin, it removes excess heat and cools you. This is actually due to a neat principle in physics, which goes like this. To convert water from a liquid to a vapour, it takes a certain amount of heat called the heat of vaporization. This heat energy increases the speed of the water molecules so that they can escape into the air. Typically, all of the sweat does not evaporate, but rather runs off your skin. In addition, not all heat energy produced by the body is lost through sweat. Some is directly radiated from the skin to the air and some is lost through respiratory surfaces of your lungs.

A major factor that influences the rate of evaporation is the relative humidity of the air around you. If the air is humid, then it already has water vapour in it, probably near saturation, and cannot take any more. Therefore, sweat does not evaporate and cool your body as efficiently as when the air is dry.

When the water in the sweat evaporates, it leaves the salts (sodium, chloride and potassium) behind on your skin, which is why your skin tastes salty. The loss of excessive amounts of salt and water from your body can quickly dehydrate you, which can lead to circulatory problems, kidney failure and heat stroke. So, it is important to drink plenty of fluids when you exercise or are outside in high temperatures. Sports drinks contain some salts to replace those lost in the sweat.

Also sweating responds to your emotional state. So when you are nervous, anxious or afraid, there is an increase in sympathetic nerve activity in your body as well as an increase in epinephrine secretion from your adrenal gland. These substances act on your sweat glands, particularly those on your palms of your hand and your armpits, to make sweat. Thus, you feel a “cold” sweat.

The increased sympathetic nerve activity in your skin also changes its electrical resistance, which is the basis of the galvanic skin response used in lie detector tests.

I know you want to get in shape and look great.  Whatever your fitness goal…to slim down…gain muscle…tone your arms or flatten your tummy…I’m here to help you accomplish your goals and to improve your fitness level. If you have enjoyed this article and the many other free features on my site, and would like some more comprehensive information such as fitness books and CD’s to aid you in achieving your health and fitness goals, please visit my ONLINE STORE where you will find innovative natural health and beauty products to help you become the BEST YOU CAN BE !

Abdominals

j02567591The following article is a small excerpt from one of my books. I hope you’ll want to learn more and let me help you to get into the best shape of your life.

Everyone wants a nice tight tummy or well defined abs, and some will go to great lengths to achieve this, sometimes doing hundreds if not thousands of sit ups daily. However, sit-ups alone will not solve your tummy troubles. Although they may help to strengthen your abs, diet and aerobic exercise together will help get rid of your unwanted fat and provide you with the results you desire.

The abdominal muscles give a considerable amount of support to your spine and help to protect your internal organs. Abdominal muscles are the center of your body strength. Your ab muscles include the Rectus Abdominis, external and internal obliques.

The most popular abdominal muscle by far is the Rectus Abdominis, and it gives the abdomen that distinctive washboard look. It has a right and left half separated by a tendinous strip about one half inch wide. The external obliques are located on the side and front of the abdomen while the internal obliques are located directly underneath the external obliques.

The abdominal muscles are layered and directed in a way that provides a variety of movements and functions. They help your torso to move forward, to swing from side to side and to twist. With this in mind it’s important to include twisting exercises in your routine as well as forward crunches. There are two great ab routines described in detail in the book ‘Get Fit Stay Fit’. 

Your abs also have a narrow range of motion.
If you lie flat on your back with your legs extended, your abs have the capacity to raise your shoulders about 30 degrees off the floor. Any further than this, the Psoas Magnus and Psoas Parvus muscles will be doing most of the work and not the abs. The Psoas muscles run from the front of your legs up through your pelvis and connect to the lowest six spinal vertebrae. They pull your trunk toward your legs as do your abs but their range of motion is huge, in fact they can pull you forward all the way from a full backbend until your chest touches your knees.

The abdominal muscles are also different because they do not attach to the bones like many other muscles do. So to develop your abs you do not have to exercise with weight the way you do with the other muscle groups.

While training abs, many people like to hold their hands behind their head. By doing this, they have a tendency to yank or pull at the head to get more force in the sit up. This puts a great deal of stress on the cervical vertebrae and can be very dangerous. If you cannot get used to putting your hands across your chest, try holding your hands at the side of your head. The important thing to remember is to let the abs do the lifting.

Never hold your breath during ab training. This increases the frigidness of the spine that your trying to flex. Slowly breathe out on the way up and inhale on the way down. Also when training abs, it’s very easy to get into a groove and just go through the motions, however for better results you should concentrate and feel your abdominal muscles contracting. The harder you concentrate the tighter the contractions and the better your results. This works with all muscle groups that you train. You should think about and concentrate on the muscle group you are working. By doing this you will be able to receive unbelievable results.

I know you want to get in shape and look great.  Whatever your fitness goal…to slim down…gain muscle…tone your arms or flatten your tummy…I’m here to help you accomplish your goals and to improve your fitness level. If you have enjoyed this article and the many other free features on my site, and would like some more comprehensive information such as fitness books and CD’s to aid you in achieving your health and fitness goals, please visit my ONLINE STORE where you will find innovative natural health and beauty products to help you become the BEST YOU CAN BE !

Arms

hm00376_The following article is a small excerpt from one of my books.  I hope you’ll want to learn more and let me help you to get into the best shape of your life.

There are a lot of muscles in the arm, but what we really need to concentrate on are three areas; the biceps, triceps and forearms.

The biceps muscle is a two jointed muscle (elbow and shoulder) and to get the best development of the biceps muscle, it is necessary to get the most effective action you can at the elbow. Proper exercises require you to be able to stabilize your shoulder, and not allow it to swing when performing biceps exercises.

The triceps muscle covers about two thirds of your upper arm and consists of three muscles. The long head, lateral head and medial head. These three muscles function as a group to extend your elbow. The triceps is an important muscle to develop because it is involved in reaching movements, pushing movements, pressing movements and extending movements.

To finish off your arm workout, you should develop the wrist and forearms. Since the wrist and forearms are involved in a lot of your other exercises, you should keep these exercises for the end of your workout. Your forearm muscles help to control your fingers, wrist and elbows.

Toned arms often reflect an active lifestyle and help to prevent repetitive use injuries. Some of the better arm exercises like, curls, extensions and pushdowns are described in proper detail in the book‘Get Fit Stay Fit’. Women who also weight train can usually double their strength without the worry of gaining huge muscle mass.

I know you want to get in shape and look great.  Whatever your fitness goal…to slim down…gain muscle…tone your arms or flatten your tummy…I’m here to help you accomplish your goals and to improve your fitness level. If you have enjoyed this article and the many other free features on my site, and would like some more comprehensive information such as fitness books and CD’s to aid you in achieving your health and fitness goals, please visit my ONLINE STORE where you will find innovative natural health and beauty products to help you become the BEST YOU CAN BE !